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Thursday, 10 October 2019
S'licha

S'licha is such a simple word. It kind of rhymes with Chutzpa, but not really. Just go with me here. These two are opposites. Chutzpa is unrepentant gall, the nerve of it all. S'licha means excuse me (notwithstanding the sarcastic use of the word) or pardon me.

If S'licha is such a simple word, why do we have such a hard time saying it with meaning? I'll tell you. Because we want to be right. So, let's try the expanded (amplified) meaning. "Please pardon me. I had no intention to offend you. Kindly accept my apology. I appreciate your giving me the benefit of the doubt. I will make every effort not to offend in the future."

All of the liturgy on Yom Kippur is centered on this one word, S'licha. We pray that God will forgive us for sins against Him. For sins against people, we must ask the people for forgiveness.

"But why should I apologize? I did nothing wrong." What are you 5? Maybe you were 99% right. That would be an extreme case. In the best case most of the blame could apply to others, but there is always some fault by both parties.

Yeshua put it this way ... John 8:7 "When they kept asking Him (should we stone the woman according to Moses), He stood up and said, 'The sinless one among you, let him be the first to throw a stone at her.' They all put down their stones and walked away." Yeshua closed the issue by saying ... John 8:10-11 "Straightening up, Yeshua said to her, 'Woman, where are they? Did no one condemn you?' 'No one, Sir,' she said. 'Then neither do I condemn you,' Yeshua said. 'Go, and sin no more.'"

Let's receive His forgiveness and be quick to forgive each other. Matthew 6:14-15 "For if you forgive others their transgressions, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive others, neither will your Father forgive your transgressions."

Posted By Rabbi Michael Weiner, 10:07am Comment Comments: 0